Close Please enter your Username and Password

OnDaFence 29M/37M  
25111 posts
3/11/2017 2:49 pm

Last Read:
3/13/2017 7:16 am

Here We GO Again !!!!!!



Here we go again shifting our clocks ahead this weekend, but is this change to daylight saving time dangerous? A little bit...... When we move our clocks forward one hour, many of us will lose that hour of sleep. In the days after daylight saving time starts, our biological clocks are a little bit off. It’s like the whole country has been given one hour of jet lag.



One hour of lost sleep sounds like a small change, but we humans are fragile, sensitive creatures. Small disruptions in our sleep have been shown to alter basic indicators of our health and dull our mental edge. When our biological clocks are off, everything about us is out of sync. Our bodies run this tight schedule to try to keep up with our actions. Since we usually eat a meal after waking up, we produce the most insulin in the morning. We're primed to metabolize breakfast before even taking a bite. It's more efficient that way. There’s some good research that finds taking over-the-counter melatonin helps reset our body clocks to a new time.
Being an hour off schedule means our bodies are not prepared for the actions we partake in at any time of the day.



One prime example: driving... In 1999, researchers at Johns Hopkins and Stanford universities wanted to find out what happens on the road when millions of drivers have their sleep disrupted. Analyzing 21 years of fatal car crash data from the US National Highway Transportation Safety Administration, they found a very small, but significant, increase in road deaths on the Monday after the clock shift in the spring: The number of deadly accidents jumped to an average of 83.5 on the "spring forward" Monday compared with an average of 78.2 on a typical Monday. It seems it's not just car accidents. Evidence has also mounted of an increase in incidences of workplace injuries and heart attacks in the days after we spring forward.



How can we abolish daylight saving time, or extend it all year round?

That’s easy!

Well, not really:......



All it would take is an act of Congress. But given the current priorities to revamp the nation’s health care law, pass infrastructure spending, and rejigger the tax code, on top of the usual congressional dysfunction, I wouldn’t count on this happening anytime soon. However, with a small dose of caution we can make it through this, self-inflicted time dilation together.



OnDaFence 29M/37M  
15297 posts
3/11/2017 2:53 pm

three


OnDaFence 29M/37M  
15297 posts
3/11/2017 2:54 pm

two


OnDaFence 29M/37M  
15297 posts
3/11/2017 2:54 pm

one


OnDaFence 29M/37M  
15297 posts
3/11/2017 2:54 pm

POOOOOFT!


Hungr4Yungr 68M
2574 posts
3/11/2017 3:16 pm

Thanks for the reminder, Bret. I started changing a few clocks already. It is a real hassle. I would like to see DST eliminated. It really serves no purpose, in spite of what the polytishins tell us.


OnDaFence 29M/37M  
15297 posts
3/11/2017 3:39 pm

    Quoting Hungr4Yungr:
    Thanks for the reminder, Bret. I started changing a few clocks already. It is a real hassle. I would like to see DST eliminated. It really serves no purpose, in spite of what the polytishins tell us.
Just be mindful that heart attacks go up by 24% over the next few days.


newfinder 67M
32540 posts
3/11/2017 3:56 pm

Surprisingly, I got an extra hour sleep.

If you don't like it lobby against it. Our biggest rural community (Saskatchewan) does not go to DST. LOL - You know how stubborn those Farmers can be.

There are lots of opponents to DST. Get off your duff; quick complaining; change it.

Personally, I couldn't care less

XOXO

Jack

Take the road less travelled.


OnDaFence 29M/37M  
15297 posts
3/11/2017 4:52 pm

    Quoting newfinder:
    Surprisingly, I got an extra hour sleep.

    If you don't like it lobby against it. Our biggest rural community (Saskatchewan) does not go to DST. LOL - You know how stubborn those Farmers can be.

    There are lots of opponents to DST. Get off your duff; quick complaining; change it.

    Personally, I couldn't care less

    XOXO

    Jack
We ARE farmers and we live by the sun not by the clocks. Through the year we change our start and finish times by the sun. It is pretty irrelevant what the clock says and what chores need to be accomplished. ALSO the world really isn't the nice round ball everyone thinks it is. The amount of daylight and "high noon" has a great deal of variance across North America... I've seen the maps but have to think about just where to find them.


whitehouse 66M
778 posts
3/11/2017 5:00 pm

yep it is that time of year again. I just wish they would live it alone.


Stevie1954 59T
14 posts
3/11/2017 5:25 pm

I am sensitive!!


Stevie1954 59T
14 posts
3/11/2017 5:26 pm

Thanks for reminding me!!


flagfun 57M
323 posts
3/11/2017 5:27 pm

Not us in AZ though, Congress will take a week off to adjust to the spring calendar while Trump tweets to a sunrise in DC or maybe Florida or maybe New York or Russia? haha!!!!!


OnDaFence 29M/37M  
15297 posts
3/11/2017 6:41 pm

    Quoting whitehouse:
    yep it is that time of year again. I just wish they would live it alone.
I think so too, however the placement of the hands of the clock is irrelevantto the sequence of the sun in the course of a day.


OnDaFence 29M/37M  
15297 posts
3/11/2017 6:42 pm

Oh yesssss .... very much so!


OnDaFence 29M/37M  
15297 posts
3/11/2017 6:43 pm

Totally my pleasure!


OnDaFence 29M/37M  
15297 posts
3/11/2017 6:44 pm

    Quoting flagfun:
    Not us in AZ though, Congress will take a week off to adjust to the spring calendar while Trump tweets to a sunrise in DC or maybe Florida or maybe New York or Russia? haha!!!!!
Another who lives by the sun and not governed by a mechanical device.


flagfun 57M
323 posts
3/11/2017 7:24 pm

Yes indeed, it's lame and outdated. Energy savings pfff
Early adoption in law
Daylight Saving Time has been used in the U.S. and in many European countries since World War I. At that time, in an effort to conserve fuel needed to produce electric power, Germany and Austria took time by the forelock, and began saving daylight at 11:00 p.m. on April 30, 1916, by advancing the hands of the clock one hour until the following October. Other countries immediately adopted this 1916 action: Belgium, Denmark, France, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Sweden, Turkey, and Tasmania. Nova Scotia and Manitoba adopted it as well, with Britain following suit three weeks later, on May 21, 1916. In 1917, Australia and Newfoundland began saving daylight.
The plan was not formally adopted in the U.S. until 1918. 'An Act to preserve daylight and provide standard time for the United States' was enacted on March 19, 1918. [See law]It both established standard time zones and set summer DST to begin on March 31, 1918. Daylight Saving Time was observed for seven months in 1918 and 1919. After the War ended, the law proved so unpopular (mostly because people rose earlier and went to bed earlier than people do today) that it was repealed in 1919 with a Congressional override of President Wilson's veto. Daylight Saving Time became a local option, and was continued in a few states, such as Massachusetts and Rhode Island, and in some cities, such as New York, Philadelphia, and Chicago.
During World War II, President Franklin Roosevelt instituted year-round Daylight Saving Time, called "War Time," from February 9, 1942 to September 30, 1945. [See law] From 1945 to 1966, there was no federal law regarding Daylight Saving Time, so states and localities were free to choose whether or not to observe Daylight Saving Time and could choose when it began and ended. This understandably caused confusion, especially for the broadcasting industry, as well as for railways, airlines, and bus companies. Because of the different local customs and laws, radio and TV stations and the transportation companies had to publish new schedules every time a state or town began or ended Daylight Saving Time.
On January 4, 1974, President Nixon signed into law the Emergency Daylight Saving Time Energy Conservation Act of 1973. Then, beginning on January 6, 1974, implementing the Daylight Saving Time Energy Act, clocks were set ahead. On October 5, 1974, Congress amended the Act, and Standard Time returned on October 27, 1974. Daylight Saving Time resumed on February 23, 1975 and ended on October 26, 1975.
Inconsistent use in the U.S.
In the early 1960s, observance of Daylight Saving Time was quite inconsistent, with a hodgepodge of time observances, and no agreement about when to change clocks. The Interstate Commerce Commission, the nation's timekeeper, was immobilized, and the matter remained deadlocked. Many business interests were supportive of standardization, although it became a bitter fight between the indoor and outdoor theater industries. The farmers, however, were opposed to such uniformity. State and local governments were a mixed bag, depending on local conditions.
Efforts at standardization were encouraged by a transportation industry organization, the Committee for Time Uniformity. They surveyed the entire nation, through questioning telephone operators as to local time observances, and found the situation was quite confusing. Next, the Committee's goal was a strong supportive story on the front page of the New York Times. Having rallied the general public's support, the Time Uniformity Committee's goal was accomplished, but only after discovering and disclosing that on the 35-mile stretch of highway (Route 2) between Moundsville, W.V., and Steubenville, Ohio, every bus driver and his passengers had to endure seven time changes!
The Uniform Time Act
By 1966, some 100 million Americans were observing Daylight Saving Time based on their local laws and customs. Congress decided to step in and end the confusion, and to establish one pattern across the country. The Uniform Time Act of 1966 (15 U.S. Code Section 260a) [see law], signed into Public Law 89-387 on April 12, 1966, by President Lyndon Johnson, created Daylight Saving Time to begin on the last Sunday of April and to end on the last Sunday of October. Any State that wanted to be exempt from Daylight Saving Time could do so by passing a state law.
The Uniform Time Act of 1966 established a system of uniform (within each time zone) Daylight Saving Time throughout the U.S. and its possessions, exempting only those states in which the legislatures voted to keep the entire state on standard time.
In 1972, Congress revised the law to provide that, if a state was in two or more time zones, the state could exempt the part of the state that was in one time zone while providing that the part of the state in a different time zone would observe Daylight Saving Time. The Federal law was amended in 1986 to begin Daylight Saving Time on the first Sunday in April.
Under legislation enacted in 1986, Daylight Saving Time in the U.S. began at 2:00 a.m. on the first Sunday of April and ended at 2:00 a.m. on the last Sunday of October.
The Energy Policy Act of 2005 extended Daylight Saving Time in the U.S. beginning in 2007, though Congress retained the right to revert to the 1986 law should the change prove unpopular or if energy savings are not significant. Going from 2007 forward, Daylight Saving Time in the U.S.


OnDaFence 29M/37M  
15297 posts
3/11/2017 8:41 pm

Wilson, Roosevelt and Johnson... ALL progressive liberals of their day...that explains everything.


sweetone09 37M
515 posts
3/11/2017 9:46 pm

I hate that the time change wish they leave it a lone


OnDaFence 29M/37M  
15297 posts
3/11/2017 10:57 pm

    Quoting sweetone09:
    I hate that the time change wish they leave it a lone
It is time to let Washington know just how we feel.


Eviloutlaw1 55M
380 posts
3/12/2017 3:01 am

"Time is a precious thing never waste it," Gene Wilder in his roll as Willie Wonka. He then proceeds to throw a alarm clock into a vat of bubbling goo.

I've never really followed DST, and I'm never to late or too early. Although the hands of the clock may tell me one thing, by body knows another.

Incidentally, we can all thank Ben Franklin for coming up with the idea of DST. Yes, along with flying kites in thunderstorms, inventing stoves, and bi-focal lenses, writing Poor Richard's Almanac, and the Do-good letters as well as being America's fist Ambassador to France. I think that old Ben had too much time on his hands, and not enough to do the things he wanted to do . His idea of DST wasn't well received by the other founding Fathers either, and they gave it a thumbs down. Which is why it took so much time to be implemented.

Silly old Ben, getting the last laugh.


OnDaFence 29M/37M  
15297 posts
3/12/2017 5:41 am

    Quoting Eviloutlaw1:
    "Time is a precious thing never waste it," Gene Wilder in his roll as Willie Wonka. He then proceeds to throw a alarm clock into a vat of bubbling goo.

    I've never really followed DST, and I'm never to late or too early. Although the hands of the clock may tell me one thing, by body knows another.

    Incidentally, we can all thank Ben Franklin for coming up with the idea of DST. Yes, along with flying kites in thunderstorms, inventing stoves, and bi-focal lenses, writing Poor Richard's Almanac, and the Do-good letters as well as being America's fist Ambassador to France. I think that old Ben had too much time on his hands, and not enough to do the things he wanted to do . His idea of DST wasn't well received by the other founding Fathers either, and they gave it a thumbs down. Which is why it took so much time to be implemented.

    Silly old Ben, getting the last laugh.
Sooner or later someone has to fit it and return sanity to this country.


OnDaFence 29M/37M  
15297 posts
3/12/2017 5:42 am

    Quoting sexslut64:
    No big deal for me. I'm retired. I just set the clocks ahead before I go to sleep and my biological clock wakes me adfer my six hours any way.
The sun wins in the end no matter how many clocks we set.


hotstuffmoe 63M
56 posts
3/12/2017 11:26 pm

Seems like this could be something we all could agree upon--a standard time set without variation throughout the year.


OnDaFence 29M/37M  
15297 posts
3/13/2017 7:16 am

    Quoting hotstuffmoe:
    Seems like this could be something we all could agree upon--a standard time set without variation throughout the year.
I believe there exists sufficient numbers of people who are sick on this time medaling distraction for a change. End this absurd invasion of our biological clocks.